HOW ACCURATE

IS THE 7DROPS TEST?

The 7DROPS allergy test uses a combination of 117 allergen extracts and 178 molecular allergens to test for 295 allergy triggers. The high number of molecular allergens is unique to our test, and brings a lot of benefits for you.

WHAT IS WHAT?

RECURRING TERMS EXPLAINED

WHAT IS WHAT?

RECURRING TERMS EXPLAINED

Allergen source

The allergen source is the allergen producer, for example dust mites.

Allergen extract

Mixture of allergenic and non-allergenic proteins. Allergen extracts are most famously used in allergy skin prick tests. Unfortunately, they cannot be standardized for testing.

Molecular allergens

A sensitizing molecule, capable of inducing the release of histamine. Molecular allergens are used in the most modern form of in-vitro blood allergy tests. Their use brings more accurate results for the patients, as well as a lot of additional information (cross-reactions, indication for immunotherapy, better risk assessment regarding anaphylaxis, and special dietary recommendations).

Allergen source
Allergen extract
Molecular allergens

FACTS ABOUT ALLERGENS

 

  • Allergens are mostly defined proteins which belong to a rather small number of families
  • Allergens from different sources but from the same protein family can cross-react
  • Allergenic proteins that often bind to IgE antibodies are described as major allergens
  • 50% of allergic patients have IgE antibodies, which are the genuine cause of allergic symptoms
  • Allergenic proteins that less often bind to IgE antibodies are described as minor allergens
  • Minor allergens are less frequent and typically cross-reactive

THE BENEFITS OF USING MOLECULAR ALLERGENS

WHAT SETS THE 7DROPS TEST APART

 

BETTER RISK ASSESSMENT

The use of molecular allergens leads to a much more precise risk assessment, meaning the risk of anaphylaxis in a patient. The increased risk for severe symptoms and anaphylactic reactions depends on the degree of sensitization to allergens with increased thermal stability and digestive resistance, for example storage proteins found in nuts.

 

INFORMATION ON CROSS-REACTIVITY

The use of molecular allergens also gives a complete resolution of possible cross-reactivities between different allergens belonging to the same protein family, for example Profilins, which are one of the major causes of cross-reactions between pollen and plant food.

 

INDICATION FOR IMMUNOTHERAPY

The use of molecular allergens gives indication about the targeted use of specific immunotherapy (SIT) to relieve allergy symptoms in the patient.

 

DIETARY RECOMMENDATIONS

The use of molecular allergens makes it possible to give differentiated dietary recommendations to every patient, for example whether a trigger food can still be tolerated when cooked, since some allergens are unstable to heat.

 

MINIMIZE FALSE-POSITIVE RESULTS

CCDs are sugars located on allergens and are able to induce the production of IgE antibodies. They are clinically irrelevant, but can lead to false results in solely extract-based tests. If the medical history of a patient is unclear, a CCD positive result might look like a grass pollen allergy at first glance, for example. As soon as CCDs are blocked from the testing process, the results turn negative. The 7DROPS allergy test automatically blocks CCDs during the processing of samples to minimize false-positive results from the start.

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PROTEIN FAMILIES & THEIR PROPERTIES

Proteins are systematically categorised in families, based on their amino acid sequence and structure.

 

Certain protein families have properties, for example:

  • Resistance to heat
  • Resistance to digestion
  • High degree of cross-reactivity

 

Knowledge about protein families and their properties helps doctors to guide the patient through therapeutic measures.

 

The ALL Allergen List gives you a comprehensive overview regarding an allergen’s common name, scientific name, component, and biochemical designation (= the name of the protein family it belongs to).

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THE PROFILIN FAMILY & CROSS-REACTIONS

Profilins are a major cause for the cross-reactivity between pollen and plant food. If a patient is sensitized to an allergen of the profilin familiy (e.g., Birch tree, Olive tree, or Mugwort), they typically exhibit Oral Allergy Syndrome (OAS) symptoms when eating plant foods like tomatoes, bananas, or melons.

 

Profilins are also described as labile proteins, since they are not stable to heat and digestion and cause more localized and lighter symptoms than their stable counterparts that can be found in nuts, for example.

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STORAGE PROTEINS IN NUTS & SEVERE REACTIONS

Different allergen proteins can cause different types of symptoms that also differ in severity and risk for anaphylactic reactions. There are food allergens with an increased thermal stability and digestive resistance, which means that cooking the foods containing these respective proteins does not change their allergenic properties – they are called stable proteins.

 

Many nuts contain stable proteins that can cause mixed to severe reactions (OAS, local symptoms, or systemic reactions like anaphylaxis) in a sensitized patient. Hazelnuts, almonds, cashews, pistachios, walnuts, pecans, brazil nuts, pine nuts, and coconuts all contain storage proteins from different protein families (e.g., 2S Albumins). Despite being officially classified as a legume, peanuts also contain similar storage proteins.

 

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